About your Search

20130119
20130119
SHOW
Today 6
Cavuto 5
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 26
CNN 23
CNNW 23
SFGTV 22
MSNBC 19
MSNBCW 19
FOXNEWS 17
FBC 14
CSPAN2 13
CSPAN 12
WRC (NBC) 8
KNTV (NBC) 6
KQED (PBS) 6
KQEH (PBS) 6
WBAL (NBC) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 281
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 286 (some duplicates have been removed)
development of mix used buildings total of 10 dwellings units and retail spaces and second floor business professional service uses. the building will contain approximately 14,000 square feet and 40 feet in height. there have been a number of modifications to the project since publication of the materials. however these changes were interior. it doesn't affect the facade or the footprint of the parks spaces have increased from 10 to 15 and to address the neighborhood's concern about lack of parking and this change is interior again and not affect the facade or building envelope and bike spaces have increased also and interior and will not affect the exterior or knowledge envelope. proposition. >> >> c that is effective and reduced affordable housing requirements by 20%. the required number of affordable housing for the project has been reduced from two to one. the project will provide 10 family sized dwelling units with family stock of one of which is affordable unit. protject will convert a site into productive mix used development. it's consistent with respect to the existing nei
of the units are two bedroom and larger so for families and we will be working hard to identify low and moderate income families in the neighborhood to qualify for the housing. we encourage you to support the determination of the planning staff and provide the conditional use authorization and other entitlements they recommended. thank you for your support of affordable housing and tdnc. >> thank you. >> good afternoon. i am steve perry with brandel architects. i am the architect of record and i have additional documents i would like to hand out. so what i am handing out to you is some additional renderings and diagrams showing the urban design and new elevations with context. so here we have our building, an aerial view, showing the context and just to start off i want to show you we have the b of a data center to our west, mercy housing to our east, and the new crescent heights building to our north, and if you could please turn two pages to the first diagram. so what i would like to do is back out a little bit and show the urban form and how it's shaped in the downtown
america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in
cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any other, and i thank you and your people for all your help in maintaining the continuity which is the bulwark of our republic. the business of our nation goes forward. these united states are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. we suffer from the longest and one of the worst sustained inflations in our national history. it distorts our economic decisions, penalizes thrift, and crushes the struggling young and the fixed-income elderly alike. it threatens to shatter the lives of millions of our people. idle industries have cast workers into unemployment, human misery, and personal indignity. those who do work are denied a fair return for their labor by a tax system which penalizes successful achievement and keeps us from maintaining full productivity. but great as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. for decades we have piled deficit upon def
and that is significant. we are seeing 28 new units of affordable housing. we have not seen anything like that. we are talking about a program about how to make low income families economically viable to on their own homes. those are significant things. the best accommodation is to build something worthwhile in ms. lam's backyard or finding other resources than the neighborhood that can assist her grandfather. i will not be supporting the appeal. and would like to motion to table item 27. and approve -- actually approve item 28 and table items 29 and 30. >> president: let me close the hearing. are there questions? supervisor chiu. >> supervisor chiu: not a question but i'm hearing from habitat if you're willing to resolve the issue. i appreciate hearing that from habitat directly. i will second supervisor avalos's motion; the merits of the appeal, they have not been significant changes to grant the appeal on the parcel map. that is the right motion to make. as he also mentioned, the opportunity to build single-family affordable units is something that is rare in the city. it is an opportunity fo
ranked as one of the most literate cities in the united states. multiple reading events are happening every night of the year competing against a big names like city arts and lectures. radar was voted the winner of these san francisco contest. after two decades of working for free michelle is able to make radar her full-time job. >> i am a right to myself, but i feel like my work in this world is eagerly to bring writers together and to produce literary events. if i was only doing my own work, i would not be happy. it is, like throwing a party or a dinner party. i can match that person with that person. it is really fun for me. it is nerve wracking during the actual readings. i hope everyone is good. i hope the audience likes them. i hope everybody shows up. but everything works out. at the end of the reading, everyone is happy. ♪ shortly. >> if you would like to speak on an agendized item please fill out a speaker card and when speaking before the commission, do state your name for the record. at this time, i'd like to take roll. commission president fong, here
they were to do to celebrate year of italian culture but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because it's wonderful for our city. i have often said our city and our strength is our international status and we do that with all the sister cities, with
project that would consist of 28 units, the original number of units in the original develop and plan. at a level of affordability good for san francisco. i am interested in hearing the arguments around this appeal and see how we can move forward with it. thank you. >> president: why do we not hear from the appellant. you have up to 10 minutes to describe the grounds for your appeal. >> reset the clock. >> hi thank for coming. my name is linda. i am here in support of the project. what i am here to question is the eight foot square area behind our backyard at 273 sagamore. the previous land developers had approached me because he noticed that our backyards were not lined up with our neighbors. at the time there was a lot of pushback from the neighborhood, not much support for the project. offered to make a change to allow me and my family to use the area in the back of little bit so my father could have a garden. we have been doing that since 2011. he gave his word that it would be fine. after this conversation, i went as far as coming into the hearings to show my support. now that
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
to vip members of congress and the official program which was a history, also has a history of the united states capitol inside plus the program of events, of course, on the public inauguration day, which is monday. you can see it right here. it's really, really quite beautiful. >> it's gold. gold glitters here. >> it's gold. >> the honor of your presence is requested at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline
. it provides opportunities for residents on either sides of the border. united states border, mexican border. when we provide that, things start falling into place. you see a reduction in crime, reduction in drug use. that's what this discussion today and we thank simon increasing for putting the fund is so important because it allows us to move forward and some of the things i think you heard and discussed, we need to increase or border infrastructure and implement a firm but fair immigration policy. we need to encourage more u.s. cities and mexican city partnerships to allow us to facilitate that trade discussed earlier. earlier in 2011, 2013, las cruces named the champion of change because we were able to show why in the southwest we've been able to increase profit and personnel in a tough and challenging time. during that time, we listened to many officials to me upon the best ration and the president said he wanted to increase trade with mexico. but that type of mandate and this type of forum, you'll see more and more trade with mexico. i appreciate you all coming out today. we eagerly
at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline but the nra's power is growing. it is growing even after newtown. breaking news, one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. we'll tell you what we know about that man and the other americans we are aware of tonight. let's get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. first, jill, what can you tell us about the american who died? >> there are not a l
the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arri
legal in most parts of the united states today. so at the 18-coca is very similar, but on the same mountainside by the same people and they both have our polloi as the principal ingredients. the caffeine and the cocaine are both in their pure form powerful stimulants. caffeine is toxic in its purest form and so i wanted to make a comparison about those, and get into the history of cocaine. that is when it crept into the question of coca-cola. the coca-cola company. that fascinated me because i grew up with those rumors. there was cocaine in coca-cola. started to take the cocaine out of coca-cola in 1902-1903. they met a german cocainemaker who basically was the person who would take out the cocaine in new jersey and we could talk today, that pharmaceutical company, that chemical company is still there today, you can go on the web site and every year see how they have to register coca leaf and register the production of cocaine as a control substance. so i went into that history and found out coca-cola -- absence to coca leaf in the last century and where this comes together today a
at that united states anti-doping agency report, it says that there were 38 blood samples taken from lance armstrong between 2009 and 2011 when he was making that comeback in the tour de france, and it showed blood levels with values with the likelihood of occurring naturally in less than 1 in a million. so a great deal of questions will be raised as lance armstrong continues to assert that he rode those last two years cleanly. there's a great deal of speculation about that. erin? >> thanks, ed. now i want to bring in our penl. david epstein is a senior writer for "sports illustrated." dana jacobson is with cbs sports and paul callan is our legal contributor. you were all critical last night. you didn't feel satisfied. let me ask you, did you feel that -- did he win you another tonight? >> no. and i said earlier there's probably no way he could have won me over. maybe i saw a little more human side when his kids were mentioned. he was -- oprah said do you owe people an apology and he listed the people he owes an apology to, and he didn't do it last night when he had a chance. he didn't do
in the entire western united states that doesn't have an adequate rail connection and that promise was made because we have the opportunity here to cut the commute for tens of thousands of people everyday in half by this investment. the vast majority of the people don't own a car. they depend on transit. well today through president obama's leadership, secretary lahood leadership, the vision of the leaders on the stage we are here to commit $942 million to fulfill that promise. [applause] >> with the signing of this grant agreement we are taking $942 million paid by california taxpayers and to create jobs now when we need them. we're also using those dollars to improve the quality of life, and as jackie spear pointed out plan for the future and economic prosperity of this whole area. when this subway extension opens as senator feinstein pointed out there will be 44,000 people using this light rail line. what she didn't point out that will make it the second or third busiest light rail in the united states. this is an environment that needs to be made and once it's built are gone the day
for the united states capitol police. my title is public information officer.s i'm an officer. the united states capitol police our responsibility in conjunction with our law enforcement partners is to ensure the safety of those attending the inaugural ceremonies throughout the weekend. first and foremost, we want everyone to enjoy the democratic process and this historic day. with any event that occurs on the capitol complex, safety is our number one priority. that said, safety and security for guests, public, et cetera, is not carried out just by us, but in partnership with our law enforcement community, metropolitan police, united states secret service, park police and other entities as well as public safety entities. the partnership that we have established to create a pretty robust plan has been in the works for many months and while i cannot go into detail about those -- about the security plan, please know we have trained extensively to address any issues that may come up during the day. thank you. >> thank you, officer. i appreciate that. as someone that did communications before heading
of provoking more actions than they have done. i think the defense minister of the united states was saying, both sides were correct, algeria was correct. it is a very complicated situation. nobody would like to lose humans, but in situations like this, you have to think of the least you can do, and that has been done. >>> the foreign minister of france has called on west african leaders to take the lead of the military intervention in mali. they say it could be weeks before their forces could do so. we have this report from the capital of mali. >> the army shows off what it says are tools and weapons seized from the rebels. this is an insight into how well armed they are. this is an anti-aircraft gun, capable of bringing down french warplanes. >> this is anti-aircraft defense, but they're using them against ground troops, against us, vehicles, and our people. >> the french and malians have made some progress against the rebels, taking control of several towns, but at a meeting, the french asked african leaders to take over the operation in mali. >> the operation is not intended to substitu
into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doctrine that will benefit us in the event that this is a requirement inside the u.s. >> thank you. this morning secretary schultz asked one of the panels that was involved in communications and command and control about in this age of information, real-time information, how you're hit with a sea of information and how do you deal with that. something as senior leaders all of you have dealt with. and i believe admiral zukunft used th
, they captured all men in the pillbox. remarkably a lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said basically i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edlund said to him to the commander of the fort -- take me to the commander of the fort and that is what he did. with his tiny gun and a fabulous four when trudy locris battery, down an elevator, through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of this guns and -- guns of navarrone type situation and went to the commanding officer's office. edlund decided to break through the board. at that point of the commanding officer looked at him and said what do you want? he said we would like you to surrender the fort. the commanding officer was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the steel telephone. you are my prisoner. at that point robert edlund proudly had one of the greatest moves of world war ii. he pulled out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender the locris battery. 800 men from the locris battery surrendered after he broadcast that over the loudspe
boehner. hold on, says columnist rockman. we expect too much of obama he says because in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in
begin about one fifth of the situation of drought. by september, three fifths of the united states was in a situation of drought. from crops failed. estimates of crops insurance range from $30 billion up to $40 billion. the prices went up. consumers impacted not just in the united states, but around the world. in 2011 we had a horrific drought in florida. and many of you who are watching were watching the news coverage were watching impact particularly on newborns and children and could not have been more moved profoundly by what he saw. these are the innocent and most deserving victims. at the same time, we had another drought situation. the impact was significantly less for good reason. we have a research scientist with us from the u.s. geological survey. when he spoke, use one of the most amazing and inspirational that we had heard. second we have -- forgive me for my family -- he is part of the united nations convention. a huge issue. and globally, this is one of the big ones. and requires a lot of attention. and we have climate change review by the university of nebraska at li
in the united states, they do wonderful things, wonderful creative publishing especially in a world where nobody reads anymore or very few do but you do so i am glad you are here tonight. after it came out in spain, in spanish, the university of balenciaga came out and told the first comma here to stay. it changes a bunch of stuff. lot of stuff it change was john's idea. and he was absolutely right. this chapter here i don't think anyone will understand it and also made some wonderful suggestions and so we took a chapter out and i put in an afterword, what would like to get out of diplomatic service and ando cf1 o get out of diplomatic service and and go to rutgers university where i have been ever since as a professor in the 60s or 70s where i went in 69 and i am still there and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a u.s. cultural attache from vietnam and i fought the war was a stupid idea and i had three little children and didn't want to abandon them to a war i di id't believe in. i left the diplomatic service. four years before that were the years in spain. two stories i want to focus on this
, crazy sons had one is an officer in the united states navy reserve. [applause] x i want to introduce you to the whole family. my daughter, who is a social worker. [laughter]>> this is my daughter in law. >> my number three granddaughter. my number two granddaughter, my number three granddaughter, my number four, and i want you to say hello to hunter, and the love of my life, i oldest granddaughter, who is crazy about me, a freshman in college now, naomi. i want to introduce my third son. i told my daughter when she married him, i said if you change your mind, i am keeping an. -- keeping him. [laughter][applause] i would be happy to claim it as my daughter, [indiscernible] this is a family affair. i have watched you come through. family, kids, grandkids, mothers, fathers. you all get why this is so important today heard -- today. we still have 60,000 troops in harms way. one of the things that you all know, in the national guard that are here today, they are not looking for anything. knowing that you remembered, knowing that we back home just remembered, we know what is going on -- this i
in mind if they are very concentrated and very sedentary. 10% of all people in the united states on about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle-class, middle-age people in rural areas and hold onto their guns for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people engaging crying our teens and young adults in most criminal careers are short. one of things that means if there's a new generation of young people trying to solve the problem fresh and getting their hands on guns and one way you could take about the challenge here, the situation here is if you think about the united states being like a giant bathtub with 300 million guns, but nothing to worry about the entire town. just a few million guns changing hands every year and trying to divert them away from the high risk. the other thing i like to mention that the conversation right now is a bunch of stuff going on the federal level and a bunch of states to innovate on their own. one of the things important to keep in mind the slow side from hawaii, no state is an island. every state is doing on the gun regulations that is relevant in
and started working in the united states post office; left that to become an insurance salesman, many years in that career and the golden gate insurance agency. he got a taste for union work while working on the negotiations team for the insurance workers of america. he was encouraged by calling of his to apply to the business management position to local 66a. he was the first african-american hired to head a union. 66a merge with local 400, and that merged to 790. he negotiated a number of city contracts and represented employees at discipline hearings. in 1992 he retired from 790. is a pleasure and privilege to recognize these outstanding members of san francisco and the service to our city and our county. in closing i also want to take a moment to do a personal note also on today january 15, 1967, and member the name of everett cohen, my father, was part of the squad doing a sweep to search out and destroy the enemy in vietnam. the squad was ambushed, my father was injured in the arm. a month before his twentieth birthday. later it turns out that he was participating in a historic mil
something the other day and it is nothing more than a unit of communication. so i started looking into this. a lot of research and looking into the presidents. the storyline in this, it is in a tizzy buck. so some of this stuff is funny and some of it is not so funny. what's really the nexus of the whole thing is if you look back at the early beginnings of this country and the whole concept of language and what this country was. there is a letter written between benjamin franklin and noah webster. in which they talk about the witness acts of rebellion against the british. and the use of various words to talk about it. but they are really sort of american acts to identify who we are as a people. one of the acts is public libraries. coming to this country, his father came smuggling a bible. he tells benjamin at one point that one of the things we could do is be a printer. the idea that when england come at that time, when his father came over, i was very interested in these definitions and so when he creates a free library of philadelphia, is seen as an act of resistance against the british.
of the united states will be here in attendance. she will be the one who is introducing the closer tonight, if you will, katy perry, the big headliner. i was backstage and saw usher. you are far east movement, i just talked to nick cannon, the host of this shebang here want to. the point, don lemon, of these big stars, really the stars are the children. this whole thing, very near and dear to the heart of both michelle obama and dr. jill biden is military families, not just honoring men and women in uniform, but honoring the spouses and children. and tonight it's about the kids. i just talked to a mother whose husband is about to deploy for time number five. talked to her, talked to her little-year-o 8-year-old. watch. okay, mj. big concert tonight. who are you most excited to see? >> katy perry. >> reporter: and why is that? >> because i know a lot of her songs. like, "i'm wide awake." >> reporter: and this is your first concert tonight, right? >> yes. >> so mom, it's his first concert for your two kids. >> yes. >> you guys live in alexandra, virginia. your husband is about to deploy for
. >> the united states does not negotiate with terrorists said. >> all say it again. the united states does not negotiate with terrorists. >> we do not negotiate with terrorists. we are obviously in consultations. lou: the problem with that statement is that this government has negotiated with terrorists. our government has been engaged in talks with the taliban and afghanistan since early 2009. the same group that has been a safe haven in the immediate aftermath of september 11th. documents found in the abbottabad compound the lion was killed proving a close working relationship between the two. the same group that is also responsible for a large portion of the 2200 american soldiers killed in afghanistan since 2001. not to mention the palestinian liberation organization the designation changed after we helped negotiate the deal. meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton chose her words carefully, while suggesting that the algerian government could use a hand in the battle in that region. >> it is absolutely essential that we broaden and deepen our counter-terrorism cooperation going f
closely goals outside the region as well meaning particularly the european union and e united states and to some extent the african union as well. >> suarez: why does this, mary jane deeb, immediately implicate eu? >> well, because once you attack the infrastructure which produces oil, gas and which link africa to europe, then you can create havoc in the institution of oil. and so it is important. i mean the french understood the importance of the movement in mali. they understood that as professor vandewalle was saying that once you have a movement, once you take over power w it's not simply, you know, e ploding a car here or there t is actually take over power in mali, then similar movements would be allowed to do the same in the region. >> suarez: so you buy it that the algerians under ktar are acting under sympathy with those in mali. >> absolutely. i have no doubt that the radical islamists in nrt africa and those who are in neighboring countries including in nigeria are in sympathy. so and this is what the french want to stop. and the algerian government as well. because algeri
the rebellion. >> the united nations' nuclear watchdog says it has again failed to reach a deal with iran in talks over the country's nuclear program. >> the announcement by the international atomic energy agency follows two days of intense negotiations with tehran. inspectors are trying to get access to a military site, which is allegedly used to test components for nuclear weapons. iran, though, denies that and underscores its right to nuclear research for civilian purposes. in -- another meeting is scheduled for february. >> all right, some business news now, and the chinese economy has beaten expectations for the final quarter of 2012 after nearly two years of relatively tepid performance byhe world's secondargest economic power. gross domestic product rose by 7.9% and 7.8% for the year as a whole. analysts say the outlook for china may be improving. chinese exports have continued to fall, but retail sales and industrial production have started to pick up. and germany's second biggest lender, commerzbank, could cut up to 6000 jobs according to a report. while there have been months of
warfare. united states can help. we can bring our experience from our fighting in afghanistan and iraq and provide -- the african soldiers are going to fight this battle with trading. we can provide training and logistics, and we definitely have interest in doing this, because this aqim, the body is now in mali. it has links, arms, into nigeria and libya, including the one you possibly killed our ambassador and colleagues. the squabbles of all of the areas that are ill got burned or undergoverned around the region, -- that are ill governed or ungoverned. >> good to talk to you. thank you very much. the u.n. is warning of a growing crisis in neighboring mali. there was a focus of heavy fighting. >> fleeing the violence that is engulfing much of their country, these people are from the strategically important town. it has been the focus of much of the recent fighting, with conflicting reports about who is in control. those who have escaped the violence there are grateful to have made it this far. >> people are terrified. often, they are in a horrible position, without having brought anyt
environment go in with the right knowledge and the right attitude and you can see the tactical unit at the bottom there and the crisis response civil military operations center that was there to provide the command and control of those tactical units responding on the military side, this provided a perfect environment and opportunity for them to be able to interact with the civilian partners and provide the most appropriate response and understanding. very complex and again i just want to reiterate that the military, we know when we're responding in this type of environment that we're not coming in with the heavy capability and saying don't worry, we're here to help you and take over, we're here to complement and support you with the appropriate ways that you request our needs. the next few slides that i'm going to go over here shows some of the military capability and how some of those responses that we did during this exercise can also be applied at home in a domestic environment such as a response to maybe an earthquake here in san francisco. so the first part up there, you see
of them are united states subsidaries of foreign companies. let me give you an example. we are sitting here and until nine years ago. the company that we worked at. folks news was a subsidiary of a foreign company. >> this corporation is a u.s. company. >> it was not when you came to work here. >> they don't get money from the federal government. that's the point. if you are getting subsidies from the u.s. government shouldn't you be a u.s. based company? >> what this example shows to me is the foley of president obama's argument that stimulus would create a job in the united states. capitol is fundable . this shows what e-mail said the government shouldn't be in the business of picking winners and users. >> this is something that the obama administration doesn't care about. he wants his own agen a. >> i don't know why we have to go to mark because he agrees. go ahead, mark. >> look. this is a proventional and back ward argument. >> call me provensial. >> and top hundred companies receive 50 percent of the revenue from outside of the united states and they are more engaged in poor mark
and their conclusion was, it was impossible to determine whether it had reduced any crime in the united states, in 2005, the national research council looked again. their conclusion was that the government's collection of data about guns is so poor, that it's impossible to understand whether any good is coming of these laws. you'd hate to reduce it to something as bureaucratic as the federal government's inability to track these guns, but that is about what it comes down to. there is just no evidence that those laws make any difference. >> in fact, paul, gun violence has fallen since the assault weapons ban expired. >> paul: in 2004. >> in 2004. the relevant question is that these are proposals being put forward in response to sandy hook and gun violence overall in the country. so, will they address that problem? the university background check would have been passed by the person who bought the gun used in connecticut. >> paul: well, let me argue that some the things he's proposed on mental health, easing the laws hipaa, a federal privacy law, and like administrators in schools or doctors and medical
you when it was announced that this was the tallest, largest tree of hope in the united states, if not in the world, i also wanted to say my very first thought was san francisco has always the biggest hearts in the world, thanks to all of you. thank you, donna, for your wonderful mc work here every year. and your beautiful presence. jeff carter, thank you very much, congratulations and thank you on behalf of everyone in the city, we are so proud of your work. karin that i have known for 30 years, thank you for you and all of the volunteers from the rainbow fund to put this together to place all of these 10,000 ornaments on the tree to give us the kind of attention that we would like not just because we have a great tree or city hall, but because we do always want to show our hearts first, especially during these holiday season. i know that is why, all of you are here tonight. and i want to also give a shout out to isabel iunda, thank you very much for being here, isabel. and linda mahara, thank you for your wonderful presentation, you know the stories that linda tells every yea
in the united states. that is not american exceptional is and that we can be proud of. if we cannot agree as a people to do something about that -- we did about cigarettes, thank god. and we have made progress. if we cannot do it, let's toss the whole towel in doubt. >> what happened with cigarettes is we had a deep glamorization campaign. it became uncool. we had tremendous success. smoking has been cut in half and about 50 years. it is the result of a culture. if we are talking about shootings and guns in this country, the equivalent would be the glamorization of the guns in hollywood, videogames, in the culture, and television. you would want to start with that, but nobody in power would even speak about that. the other elements are the commitment of the dangerously mentally ill, and they're the aclu and other lobbies are very strong. in those states where the commitment laws are strong, there is a love love this kind of violence. i agree with you. lastly, the elimination of guns. i think the only weaken over it achieve anything is the way australia did. 1996, they had a massacre, and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 286 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)